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Oregon Health Sciences University, USA
Title: Attentiveness of dermatologists in the middle east for the practice psychodermatololgy
Biography

Ossama Tawakol Osman is certified in Psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and has been elected a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He completed residency training at SIU-in Illinois, USA and a research fellowship in clinical psychopharmacology at the National Institute of Mental health (NIMH) in Bethesda, Maryland. His academic career is focused on bridging clinical research and practice through community clinical, research, and educational program development and had an extensive and diverse international experience. At USF in Tampa, Florida he developed the psychiatric research program at the Bay Pines VAMC. At SIU he helped to develop the academic research program in developmental disabilities in Illinois. At Mercer University in Georgia, he developed the mental health community-wide programs in substance abuse, mental health and developmental disabilities. In Saudi Arabia, he helped develop the substance abuse and addiction services for the western region of the kingdom through his capacity as the Medical Director of Al-Amal Hospital-Jeddah 1999-2004. In the UAE research activities emphasized epidemiologic community studies in the primary care and interdisciplinary clinical outcomes research. Organizational involvement is a past president of American-Arab Psychiatric Association, Member of scientific/executive councils for the Arab Board of Psychiatry and Chairperson for its Committee on Curriculum/Accreditation/Credentialing.

Abstract

Background: Many dermatologic patients suffer from coupled psychiatric symptoms. Proper treatment of these patients requires parallel psychiatric care. The main objective of this study was to assess awareness of Middle East dermatologists to psychocutaneous medicine. Methods: This study utilized a survey that was originally developed for dermatologists in the Upsychodermatology’ describes the psychiatric aspects of skin diseases as well as the dermatologic manifestations of psychiatric problems. Results: 57 dermatologists from United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Kuwait, Iraq, Jordan and Lebanon completed the survey. 49 (86%) reported clear understanding of the term psychodermatololgy, nine (16%) were very comfortable in diagnosing and treating these disorders, and 52 (91%) were unaware of patient/family resources on psychodermatology (e.g., association for psychoneurocutaneous Medicine of North America, European Society for dermatology and psychiatry, psychodermatology UK, and Japanese Society of Psychosomatic Dermatology). Acne, alopecia, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis were common skin diagnoses coupled with psychiatric manifestations. 13 (23%) dermatologists expressed interest in attending educational activities on managing psychodermatologic diseases. Conclusion: Patients who had psycho cutaneous disorders might not receive necessary care because of insufficient experience in managing their problems. This survey supports the need for incorporating formal training on psychodermatololgy in postgraduate dermatology programs. There is also a need for establishing dermatology–psychiatry limited states to assess regional experience with psychodermatololgy disorders. The reasons especially acquainted with managing the patients.

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